B Vitamins, Type 2 Diabetes, Depression

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Since 1993, I’ve dealt with type 2 diabetes personally. Well before that date, I was dealing with emotional depressions of varying depths. For a significant portion of my life, I knew of no other way of being. My depression has seemed stronger than therapy, medications, and anything else I tried to make it so I could feel like other people looked.

This dissatisfaction has been endured, not enjoyed in the least. I’ve paid a series of costs over time. The level of B vitamins, which are key in the development and maintenance of the nervous system, are well connected with type 2 diabetes and clinical depression. This is what some doctors have deduced and documented in published reports.

B vitamins can be proven to be related to depression control, here’s some proof. In a report published in Psychosomatics in the late 1980’s, A. Missagh Gharirian of McGill University in Montreal, it was stated that low levels of the B vitamin folic acid was linked to depression. Relief of depression was achieved with folic acid supplementation when people that had both issues were studied under Dr. Ghadirian’s care. Modification of depression occurred within 100 days of folic acid supplementation.

folic acid was given at generally accepted dosages:800 mg a day for soon-to-be mothers, 500 mg a day for nursing mothers, and 400 mg a day for adults. Unused amounts are removed within 24 hours by the body – it is water soluble.

Absorbable folic acid is abundant in vegtable broth from warming fresh vegetables.

B vitamins are easily blocked from the body through interaction with many over-the-counter and prescription drugs. Some of the things that interfere with B vitamins include Vitamin C at high levels, several chemotherapy drugs, both aspirin (commonly prescribed to type 2 diabetics) and acetaminophen (Tylenol),

A common type 2 diabetic drug is metaformin. It controls both glucose and encourages insulin sensitivity. It also interferes with vitamin B12 absorption. Decreased B12 absorption is proven in between 10 and 30 percent of the type 2 diabetics that are taking metaformin, according to the Diabetes Self Management blog. Some people increased their energy dramatically by supplementing with B12, according to posts at that blog.

A lack of energy will certainly encourage — is that the right word?– depression, and a nervous system that produces numbness and tingling in the feet certainly isn’t up to snuff as well. My point is that even if there isn’t a proven link specifically between type 2 diabetes, B12 vitamin deficiency, and depression, it certainly wouldn’t be much of a stretch. Especially for some who lives through it, like me.

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